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Rights Talk: Youth and Civil Liberties Conference

November 20, 2014

SFU Harbour Centre
Vancouver
9:00 am

We are pleased to present the 10th annual Rights Talk: Youth and Civil Liberties Conference taking place from 9:00am to 3:30pm on November 20, 2014 at SFU Harbour Centre.

* Students must register for their preferred afternoon sessions by following the link below. This process is first come, first served until the sessions are full. Please note that this process is only for students and teachers who have had their participation confirmed in advance by conference coordinator Alyssa Stryker. There are no additional spots for this conference at this time.*

Register here for your workshops:

 Event Schedule

ProgramSchedule2014

Workshops:

1. COMPASSION: WHY DO WE BOTHER?

with James Tigchelaar

People from socially disadvantaged places are more likely to contract HIV, live with addictions, and die prematurely than the socially advantaged. How do we respond to this as individuals and as a society? What challenges does this present in providing health care in these areas?

 2.Know YOUR Rights – Detention, Arrest, Search and Seizure

with Raji Mangat

Do you know your rights? What happens if you are stopped by the police in the street — do you have to answer questions? Can the police search you? What about your cell phone – can the police search it? This workshop will answer these questions and more!

 3.Power Play: Marginalization in the Law

with Chrissie Arnold

In this session, we use games and activities to facilitate discussions about power, discrimination and equality. It serves as a brief introduction to equality law in Canada, introducing the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and looking at some of the cases where it has been used. If you are interested in social change and how the law can be used to further it, don’t miss this session!

4. ALONE AND AFRAID: THE USE OF SOLITARY CONFINEMENT IN CANADIAN JAILS AND PRISONS 

with Grace Pastine

Every day, in jails and prisons across Canada, prisoners are held in solitary confinement. They spend 22 or more hours each day, alone, usually in cells the size of a bathroom, for months or years at a time. Solitary confinement can cause extreme psychological harm. So why is Canada continuing to confine prisoners in lengthy solitary confinement?

 

5. CROWDSOURCING SENSIBLE PRIVACY SAFEGUARDS FOR CANADIANS IN THE 21st CENTURY

with David Christopher

An introduction to privacy issues and a look at how government agencies like CSEC can monitor law-abiding Canadians. What do we know, and what are Canadians doing about it? There will also be an exciting hands-on opportunity to crowdsource ideas for new safeguards to help protect Canadians from government surveillance.